When to Consider Hiring a Tutor for a Child with ADHD

18 07 2017

With tremendous appreciation and credit given to: Janice (“Jan”) Miller, guest contributor (Check out her website, “Safety Today.”)

Tutoring sessions are beneficial for all children, but can be especially helpful for those with a learning disorder, such as dyslexia, ADHD, or a visual processing disorder. These children typically put in extra work to stay on the same academic track as their peers. Fortunately, tutors can give the additional time and attention needed for ADHD children to master subjects and establish good study habits. “A specialized tutor can present information in a way that’s easier for a child with a learning disability to understand, which can then make school less difficult and more enjoyable,” says Parents.com’s article 6 Signs Your Child Needs a Tutor by Mali Anderson. So how do you know if your child needs a tutor?

Grades and Time Management

Declining grades are often the most obvious sign that a child needs a tutor. The decline may be gradual or sudden. If you notice a change, speak with your child’s teacher, who can tell you if your child is having difficulty with certain concepts or subjects or if your child is having difficulty staying focused in class. A tutor can help your child regardless of the underlying issue.

Poor time management is another sign. An occasional delay is to be expected, but if your child consistently procrastinates and ignores repeated reminders, there could be a problem. When a child puts off projects and postpones homework, he or she may eventually fall too far behind and won’t be able to keep up as workloads increase, so it’s important to jump on this issue fast. A tutor can catch your child up to speed and help him or her learn better time management skills.

Confusion and Confidence

Being consistently confused is a worrisome sign that your child may need a tutor. According to Parents.com, if certain concepts are consistently confusing your child, he or she may not be meeting grade-level expectations. Your child may repeatedly express anxiety about tests and become defensive when you try to help. The confusion, anxiety, and frustration can stem from a lack of clarity in curriculum concepts or from the child’s inability to focus on the curriculum and thus not understanding the material. Regardless, a tutor can help your child comprehend each subject at the current level and learn better ways to understand the concepts and curriculum.

Lacking confidence is another sign that your child could use a tutor’s help, says Parents.com.
A tutor can successfully help your child become self-assured and have newfound confidence, which can correlate to better grades and more enjoyment from school. Feeling uncertain about a new concept is normal, but if your child is feeling overwhelmed and can’t keep up, the child’s impulse may be to run and hide rather than ask for help, so try to stay cued in on your child’s confidence levels.

Lastly, it is not always possible for a parent to manage a child’s homework. A tutor should be considered if a new obligation will result in your inability to assist as much, if you notice your child’s workload reaches a point where you cannot help as much, or if the material or manner in which it’s covered is something you find unfamiliar.

Finding a Tutor

Consider all possible sources of information when searching for a tutor, including educators and parents in your community. Even your child’s pediatrician can help point you in the right direction. Contact your child’s school, your state’s department of education, and national organizations, such as the Association of Educational Therapists, who can provide online referrals to educational therapists who tutor children with learning disabilities.

The school district should have a special education director who can help you. Other members of the school include speech therapists, counselors, and after-school program directors. You can also contact the local chapter of a national organization, such as Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD) or Learning Disabilities Association of America (LDA).

If you notice your child struggling, don’t wait to get help. The sooner your child receives assistance, the better. A tutor can assist your child to improve study habits, cultivate self-motivation, and keep up with upcoming assignments and tests. Learning these skills will not only ensure academic success; these life skills for making healthy decisions will extend into home life, social life, and stay with your child as he or she grows into an adult. Be sure to check out this guide for more information on how to keep your child safe and making smart decisions.

ADHD article picPhoto Credit: Body-n-Care,Pixabay

 

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Different or Special

30 05 2014

myhearthisthrone

Perhaps your life has been touched by an individual with a disability. Since I began my career in special education over 36 yrs. ago, many children with disabilities have enriched my life. They taught me many lessons. By living their lives with joyful resilience. Some of them left this earth too soon. Like Shane.

I’m grateful Shane’s life intersected mine. I knew that young man as the worship leader in our Sunday school class for children with special needs. Shane’s learning disability didn’t inhibit his singing. With a heart full of praise, he sang with enthusiasm to God. His uninhibited, joyful, and loud singing lifted everyone’s heart to heaven.

Shane’s sister wrote the following tribute for his memorial service. Through her words, Shane’s testimony lives on. His example continues to lift hearts toward heaven. That’s my prayer for you.

♥♥♥♥♥

In Celebration of Shane McGonagle

A Testimony Written by His Sister, Michelle

As a child, I enjoyed hearing people say, ‘Shane is different’ and I can say he was.  As siblings, we would fight and of course I was older and bigger so I would win.  Shane was different.   He never would hold a grudge and he would always forgive me and love me always.

As a teenager, I would hear people say, ‘Shane is different’ and I can say he was.  Most teenagers can’t imagine living a life with epilepsy.  They would think life wasn’t fair to them and that everything was difficult.  Shane was different.  He could go to school each and every day with a smile – ready to face the day…never sorry for what his life was like.

As a young adult, I would hear people say, ‘Shane is different’ and I can say he was.  When other young adults were moving on in their careers and getting married, Shane was different.  Shane had surrendered his life to the Lord.  Shane realized that only God could provide him with peace and happiness.

As an adult, I would hear people say, ‘Shane is different’ and I can say he was.  When most adults went to family functions or picnics, they would sit around and chat about their aches and pains, jobs and children.  Not Shane.  He would gather all the children together and tell them about how much he loved Jesus.  He would teach them and sing every song that he had ever sung since he was a little boy.  The kids loved him unlike any other adult there.  Shane was different.

When most people would go to church, listen to the service, and sneak out the side door to get home as quickly as possible, not Shane…He would get excited about the opportunities to serve the Lord by singing with the special needs class each Sunday.  Shane was different.

When most people would try to get a few extra hours of sleep on Saturday, Shane would get up, get dressed, and grab his stack of sports tracts.   He would head for the street to tell people that Jesus loved them.

Why was Shane so different?  Shane was different because he understood exactly what God wanted all of us to understand.  Shane understood that God loved him and gave His only Son to die for him.  Shane realized that life was not about what was here on earth.  Shane realized what mattered the most – and that was eternity.  Shane was different.  He understood what life was all about.

He had a burden to see people come to know the Lord, and he wanted to be the one to tell them.  ‘Shane is different’ I would hear people say.  When he was a little boy, I think Shane would look at Phil and me and he wanted to be just like us.  That’s what little brothers do.  But the truth is…as I stand here today missing Shane so much already…I want to be more like him.  Like Shane, I want to be different too.