When to Consider Hiring a Tutor for a Child with ADHD

18 07 2017

With tremendous appreciation and credit given to: Janice (“Jan”) Miller, guest contributor (Check out her website, “Safety Today.”)

Tutoring sessions are beneficial for all children, but can be especially helpful for those with a learning disorder, such as dyslexia, ADHD, or a visual processing disorder. These children typically put in extra work to stay on the same academic track as their peers. Fortunately, tutors can give the additional time and attention needed for ADHD children to master subjects and establish good study habits. “A specialized tutor can present information in a way that’s easier for a child with a learning disability to understand, which can then make school less difficult and more enjoyable,” says Parents.com’s article 6 Signs Your Child Needs a Tutor by Mali Anderson. So how do you know if your child needs a tutor?

Grades and Time Management

Declining grades are often the most obvious sign that a child needs a tutor. The decline may be gradual or sudden. If you notice a change, speak with your child’s teacher, who can tell you if your child is having difficulty with certain concepts or subjects or if your child is having difficulty staying focused in class. A tutor can help your child regardless of the underlying issue.

Poor time management is another sign. An occasional delay is to be expected, but if your child consistently procrastinates and ignores repeated reminders, there could be a problem. When a child puts off projects and postpones homework, he or she may eventually fall too far behind and won’t be able to keep up as workloads increase, so it’s important to jump on this issue fast. A tutor can catch your child up to speed and help him or her learn better time management skills.

Confusion and Confidence

Being consistently confused is a worrisome sign that your child may need a tutor. According to Parents.com, if certain concepts are consistently confusing your child, he or she may not be meeting grade-level expectations. Your child may repeatedly express anxiety about tests and become defensive when you try to help. The confusion, anxiety, and frustration can stem from a lack of clarity in curriculum concepts or from the child’s inability to focus on the curriculum and thus not understanding the material. Regardless, a tutor can help your child comprehend each subject at the current level and learn better ways to understand the concepts and curriculum.

Lacking confidence is another sign that your child could use a tutor’s help, says Parents.com.
A tutor can successfully help your child become self-assured and have newfound confidence, which can correlate to better grades and more enjoyment from school. Feeling uncertain about a new concept is normal, but if your child is feeling overwhelmed and can’t keep up, the child’s impulse may be to run and hide rather than ask for help, so try to stay cued in on your child’s confidence levels.

Lastly, it is not always possible for a parent to manage a child’s homework. A tutor should be considered if a new obligation will result in your inability to assist as much, if you notice your child’s workload reaches a point where you cannot help as much, or if the material or manner in which it’s covered is something you find unfamiliar.

Finding a Tutor

Consider all possible sources of information when searching for a tutor, including educators and parents in your community. Even your child’s pediatrician can help point you in the right direction. Contact your child’s school, your state’s department of education, and national organizations, such as the Association of Educational Therapists, who can provide online referrals to educational therapists who tutor children with learning disabilities.

The school district should have a special education director who can help you. Other members of the school include speech therapists, counselors, and after-school program directors. You can also contact the local chapter of a national organization, such as Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD) or Learning Disabilities Association of America (LDA).

If you notice your child struggling, don’t wait to get help. The sooner your child receives assistance, the better. A tutor can assist your child to improve study habits, cultivate self-motivation, and keep up with upcoming assignments and tests. Learning these skills will not only ensure academic success; these life skills for making healthy decisions will extend into home life, social life, and stay with your child as he or she grows into an adult. Be sure to check out this guide for more information on how to keep your child safe and making smart decisions.

ADHD article picPhoto Credit: Body-n-Care,Pixabay

 

Advertisements

Actions

Information

2 responses

15 08 2017
stayfitastoria

If you live in NYC or Long Island, you can use tutormenagerie.com to find the right tutor for you!

16 08 2017
Vicki Chandler

Thanks for that info!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: