Getting Away With It

6 04 2012

Children know how to get away with it.

They run inside the halls of school. Then screech to a halt when a teacher is spotted.

A quick glance at a classmate’s test paper goes unnoticed by the teacher.

Students’ infractions don’t always go undetected. Sometimes they’re caught. There’s a price to pay. Consequences to be suffered.

Wouldn’t it be nice if someone volunteered to take our punishment? Just for fun, imagine this surprise ending to exceeding the speed limit. You get pulled over by a police officer. Just before the ticket is written, a stranger pulls up behind you. He gets out of his car. The unfamiliar person persuades the officer to let him pay for your ticket. You drive away with a clean record. Like a dream come true.

It’s fun to fantasize. But daydreams end. Reality hits.

That’s when we yearn for Someone who really will save us. The Easter story is God’s love story to us.

We all are sinners. Even if we think of doing something wrong, the Bible tells us God counts that as sin. But, Someone has taken our punishment. Jesus died for our sin. He took our punishment so we wouldn’t have to go to hell after we die. He saved us from eternal death. His gift of salvation is offered freely.

Easter is a well-known story. Familiar even to young children.

Years ago, I wanted to help my second graders better understand Christ’s act of love.

In the Christian school where I taught, misbehavior at recess was punished by time out. The misconduct was dealt with by sentencing the student to stand at The Wall. There, the child would watch the others play until the designated time was up. The amount of time depended on the offense.

Not sharing nicely – 2 mins.

Bothering another child – 5 mins.

Teasing someone else – 10 mins.

Repeated naughtiness – 15 mins.

Throwing stones – 20 mins.

Intentionally hitting – 25 mins.

      

Aides supervised recess time during the teachers’ lunch. Before lunch one day, I told an aide to let me know when the first student disobeyed a rule. I would stand by The Wall instead of that student to illustrate an innocent person taking a guilty person’s punishment.

The first student to be disciplined owed 25 mins.!

“You may go play. I’ll take your punishment. I’ll stand here instead of you.”

Off the bewildered student scurried.

Quickly, a crowd of students gathered by The Wall. Never before had they seen a teacher standing there. Some were quietly curious. Others speculated. Many understood the point.

One called out, “Let’s bet for her clothes!” Referring to how they cast lots for Christ’s clothes.

The mob of onlookers roared with laughter.

It was a moment of insight for me. Reflecting on how they mocked Jesus while He gave the ultimate gift.

The ‘lesson’ was a success. Students of all grades were abuzz with the news. A teacher had to stand at The Wall! The humorous incident conveyed a powerful message.

We assume children understand Christian terminology/Church and Sunday School language. That’s not always the case. My intention: to take what they understood and use it to give deeper insight into phrases such as, “sacrificial love”, “took our punishment”, and “died on the cross for our sins.”

Reflecting on the crucifixion and resurrection helps to build greater insight. We can better comprehend our Father’s love. He gave His only Son to die for us. He who was sinless willingly suffered and died on the cross for our sin. To make a way for us to have everlasting life in heaven.

May you have a blessed celebration of our Lord’s resurrection.

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